Year 5 Science Booklets

I have been using booklets in my Year 5 Science lessons for a number of years now and feedback from pupils and parents has always been extremely positive. For me, the main advantages of using booklets are as follows:

  • The format is standardised – pupils receive a printed copy of the booklet at the start of each unit – there is always much excitement when they do!
  • They are an excellent resource for pupil practice e.g. in preparation for assessments
  • They include space for structured / semi-structured notes
  • In preparing the booklets, I am made to think deeply about the content and structure of each and every lesson
  • I integrate practicals into the booklets and provide the science technicians with a copy so that they can plan well in advance
  • They are extremely useful for cover lessons and absentees
  • They contain shed loads of questions for independent practice and extension activities to stretch and challenge
  • In the long-term, I have found that they save paper and prevent any last minute print jobs

Adam Boxer wrote a fantastic blog on booklets and how he uses them in his lessons, available here.

Let’s take a look inside my Year 5 Science booklets…

The booklets are divided into discrete lessons each with a title and learning objectives. They also contain space for structured notes (word fills) and semi-structured notes (questions with empty boxes).
Practicals are integrated into the booklets – here, the pupils are asked to investigate which material is the best thermal insulator in order to design a new lunchbox for the Brilliant Bag Company. Scaffolds (e.g. the blank results table and graph axes) are removed as the pupils work their way through the booklets over the course of the year. Key vocabulary is highlighted in blue and aligns with a glossary at the back of each booklet (see below). Note that the conclusion is presented as an email to the product development team at the Brilliant Bag Company.
Here, the pupils investigate which sized parachute causes Willy Wonka’s parachutes (from his chocolate delivery drones) to fall most slowly, and therefore stops the chocolate from breaking.
Traffic lights and unit summaries at the end of each booklet help pupils evaluate their learning and prepare for assessments.
Key vocabulary is highlighted in blue throughout each booklet. This aligns with a keyword glossary.
Each booklet also contains shed loads of questions and additional activities such as word searches and crosswords for independent practice.